An introduction to the genocide in the twentieth century

Many scholars have concurred that the twentieth century was the century of genocide. Herero in —, the Armenian genocide in the Ottoman Empire in —, the Holodomor in the former Soviet Ukraine in —, the Jewish Holocaust in —, Bangladesh inCambodia in —, East Timor in —, Bosnia in —, and Rwanda in Essentially, it must determine effective means of placing significant pressure on such states and escalate such pressure if the situation deteriorates.

There is a need, it seems to me, to put genocide and the Convention in the context of both human rights law and sociological theories of intergroup relations, collective violence, political violence, and state terror.

I have listed several definitions on the accompanying handout, including my own, which seeks to parallel the terms of the convention but to apply it to all collectivities—nonviolent groups with shared identification and values.

By studying these genocides carefully - the intentions of those in power, the motivations of the perpetrators, the experiences of the victims and the role of the bystanders - future genocides could perhaps be predicted and even prevented or at least curtailed.

List of genocides by death toll

Despite the carnage of the twentieth century, our understanding of genocide remains partial. There has been much controversy over the UNGC definition.

European Genocide in the Twentieth Century

Yet surely history can teach current policy-makers, organisations and indeed individuals many things, if only they care to heed them. Genocides before and after the Second World War have had many instigators: If you have read a book published beforethat book was not aware of this recent admissions.

Introduction: the study and history of genocide

There are cases, however, when preventive diplomacy may in fact fail and genocide is already underway. There was a sustained attack or continuity of attacks by the perpetrator to physically destroy group members; The perpetrator was a collective or organized actor or commander of organized actors; Victims were selected because they were members of a collectivity; The victims were defenseless or were killed regardless of whether they surrendered or resisted; and The destruction of group members was undertaken with intent to kill and murder was sanctioned by the perpetrator.

In its present form, the United Nations Convention on Genocide dictates that genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group: Let us start by clarifying the terms.

List of genocides by death toll

From the Irish Potato Famine to the decimation of Australian indigenous peoples to the Holocaust, Meierhenrich provides a variety of illuminating perspectives on how people commit, experience, and remember genocide.

Although readiness need not necessarily be transformed to action, it is a disturbing omen. In that regard, then, one of his key aims is to educate about the insidious nature and results of prejudice, discrimination, antisemitism, racism, and the hatred of the other.

In particular, the issue of the singularity or uniqueness of the Holocaust as an event has been the subject of much controversy.

In short, there are plenty of options for governments.Apr 09,  · The Darfur genocide was the first genocide in the twentieth century and it is also the first genocide to be declared genocide.

Sadly the Darfur genocide still remains and millions of people are still being affected as of today. The worst genocides of the 20th and 21st Centuries by don't seem to know what "20th century" means and keep sending me emails about the Atlantic slave trade, the Native Americans, the Irish famine, etc.

See also Wars and Casualties of the 20th and 21st Century: a genocide like the one in Rwanda that was not ordered by anyone is not. - "The twentieth century was termed the 'century of genocide' because of the high number of cases of genocide during that time period," (Maritz ).

Genocide is the deliberate killing of people who belong to a particular racial, political, or cultural group. See also Wars and Casualties of the 20th and 21st Century: a genocide like the one in Rwanda that was not ordered by anyone is not listed in this page but it is in that page.

Genocide and Other State Murders in the Twentieth Century

Genocide as defined by the United Nations in means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial or religious group, including: (a) killing members of the group (b) causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group (c) deliberately inflicting on the group conditions.

The term 'Genocide' was coined by Polish writer and attorney, Raphael Lemkin, in by combining the Greek word 'genos' (race) with the Latin word 'cide' (killing).

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An introduction to the genocide in the twentieth century
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